$1b damage bill: The suburbs hardest hit by super cell storm

 

The damage bill from a super-cell storm that ripped through Brisbane's outer suburbs on the weekend is expected to top a billion dollars.

Insurers have already reported more than 8500 claims from the storm, which contained base-ball sized hail that ripped holes in roofs, smashed windows and solar panels.

RACQ said the total damage bill from the storm would top $1 billion, making it worse than a similar weather event in 2014. RACQ said it had received more than 3100 claims, mostly hail damage to cars and homes.

Suncorp said the worst hit were Springfield Lakes, Greenbank, Rosewood and Fernvale. More than 2000 homes in Springfield Lakes were still without power on Monday morning and it will be months before some Ipswich residents can safely return to their homes.

The Insurance Council of Australia said about 40 per cent of claims were for damage to homes including roofs, awnings, skylights, solarpanels, windows. shutters and contents while 60 per cent of claims were for damage to cars, vans and trucks.

Damage to the roof and solar panels of the Springfield Lakes home of Nicole and Wade Milne.
Damage to the roof and solar panels of the Springfield Lakes home of Nicole and Wade Milne.

Suncorp said that while it was too early to accurately estimate ultimate claims numbers or costs in relation to the storm, as of Monday it had received 3,600 claims.

Suncorp Group chief executive Steve Johnston said these numbers were expected to rise in the coming days. "Our claim teams across our brands including AAMI, Suncorp, Apia GIO and Vero are out on the ground providing support to our customers, assisting them in getting claims assessed as soon as possible," said Mr Johnston.

"We urge our customers to please continue to take every safety precaution as they inspect any damage. Their safety must be the number-one priority."

Mr Johnston said Suncorp's claim teams could arrange emergency make-safe work and if necessary, organise temporary accommodation for customers.

Jaiden Morgan with his storm damaged car at Springfield Lakes. Picture: Richard Walker
Jaiden Morgan with his storm damaged car at Springfield Lakes. Picture: Richard Walker

The Insurance Council of Australia has warned people about scams merchants, known as disaster chasers, operating in the area after the storm.


The council said that within hours of Saturday's hailstorm, disaster chasers had started door-knocking damaged homes, seeking to exploit vulnerable householders.

Insurance Council chief executive Andrew Hall said disaster chasers offered urgent inspections or repairs for cash but leave the work either poorly done or not completed. They may not have a building licence, trade qualifications, professional indemnity insurance or an ABN. Some have been known to use standover tactics to demand money. Residents should contact police if they suspect they have been approached by such people.

Originally published as $1b damage bill: The suburbs hardest hit by super cell storm


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