THE TEAM: Mundubbera Hospital, ca. 1950s. Back: Sr Paschke, Sr Curtis, Matron Crudgington, Sr Larkin, Nurse Kusay. Front: Nurse Geck, Nurse Tough, Nurse Campbell.
THE TEAM: Mundubbera Hospital, ca. 1950s. Back: Sr Paschke, Sr Curtis, Matron Crudgington, Sr Larkin, Nurse Kusay. Front: Nurse Geck, Nurse Tough, Nurse Campbell. Facebook

Commemorative book will tell town's story via its hospital

WHAT dates back to 1923, has been the birthplace of hundreds of locals, and has been visited at one time or another by almost everyone who has ever lived in Mundubbera?

The answer is Mundubbera Hospital.

On Saturday, October 12, the Mundubbera Hospital Auxiliary will mark the 20th anniversary of the opening of the multi-purpose health service, and the 96th year since the original hospital was opened, with the launch of a commemorative book launch and an auction.

The History of Mundubbera Hospital 1923-2019, commissioned by the auxiliary, features stories of the hospital's history, staff memories, and dozens of photographs, a memento not only of the hospital's past but also of the community's story.

"Prior to the opening of the town's hospital in 1923, Mundubbera residents who were seriously ill or injured often died unless they could be transported by horse-drawn vehicle to Gayndah Hospital, which had been in operation since the 1850's,” author Sue Crofts said.

"It was a hard time for the early settlers who faced many risks and dangers in their everyday lives.

"Many had families who often had need of medical help during childbirth, epidemics, and the many unfortunate accidents that occurred.

"Think for a moment about the frequent use of arsenic and dynamite, horses, primitive machinery, firearms, snakes, tree-felling, cattle-handling and the use of cooking fires, and you have a lot of accidents waiting to happen.

"Now picture what happened next: some rudimentary first aid; an uncomfortable and interminable trip of thirty plus miles to Gayndah for medical aid; then the possibility of death, amputation, or perhaps recovery for the lucky ones.

"Fortunately, our town has come a long way. Now we have a modern medical facility to be proud of.”

Dawn Ogden, Monica Wooldridge and Vivien Smyth at the O'Regan Memorial Gate.
Dawn Ogden, Monica Wooldridge and Vivien Smyth at the O'Regan Memorial Gate. Contributed

The evening will also pay homage to Mundubbera's first medical superintendent, Dr Stanley O'Regan.

Three of his sons, Bill, Peter and Rob O'Regan, will be special guests on the night.

There will be a display of vintage medical equipment and rarely seen photographs from the hospital archives.

Entry is $25 per person and includes food provided by Kel's Katering accompanied by a complimentary glass of wine or bubbly.

The auction, hosted by Graham Lohse, includes dozens of sought-after items, including a live steers, bales of hay, accommodation at Mundubbera Motel, IGA and Mundubbera Tyre Service vouchers, and many more.

Books will be on sale for $30.

RSVP by October 5 to Monica on 0488 654 218.


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