FAMILY-RUN BUTCHER: It’s the end of an era for Shakira Beezley, Mark Bettiens, Ethan Wain, Lisa Wain and Jasen Wain, Kelly Reilley and baby Adjani, Chantelle Wain, Stephanie Wain and baby Rosie. Picture: Contributed
FAMILY-RUN BUTCHER: It’s the end of an era for Shakira Beezley, Mark Bettiens, Ethan Wain, Lisa Wain and Jasen Wain, Kelly Reilley and baby Adjani, Chantelle Wain, Stephanie Wain and baby Rosie. Picture: Contributed

Family-run butcher closing after nearly seven years

WHAT started out as dream for the Wain family, and turned into nearly seven years of success thanks to their hard work and support, has now come to an end.

Lisa Wain, along with her husband Jasen and daughter Chantelle, has been fighting to keep The Farmers Butcher afloat.

“It’s gotten to the point where the drought has just gotten too bad,” Mrs Wain said.

“There’s no positive outlook here and no way for us to keep our doors open.

“It’s not getting any better.”

Reminiscing on their journey, Mrs Wain said the family had loved their time working in Eidsvold.

“When we first bought the shop nearly seven years ago we were wanting to create a ­paddock-to-plate solution,” she said.

“This was because we have our own farm in Mundubbera where we raise our own beef.

“We were wanting to do it all ourselves and we were able to for a long time thanks to our family, team of employees and our loyal customers.”

Mrs Wain said shutting the shop’s doors was a tough decision, especially considering the love their family has for Eidsvold.

“We got off to such a great start,” Mrs Wain said.

“I think we made some real headway in our first couple of years of business.

“We were fortunate enough to be able to employ some amazing locals and to have such supportive and loyal customers here.

“Then we also started selling our products at the markets at Hervey Bay, which was also really well received.”

Despite what seemed to be a successful business, The Farmers Butcher started to struggle along with the ­economy and due to drought.

“After four or five years it grew more and more difficult to meet prices,” Mrs Wain said.

“Then suddenly all of the prices had skyrocketed, for all of the meat.

“It became nearly impossible to keep the prices low and affordable for our residents while also keeping our quality and paying our staff.”

This was an ongoing battle for the Wain family, until it really did become impossible.

“The drought affected us quite badly on the farm and has left us without much hope,” Mrs Wain said.

“The last few months have been the worst. This has been our lowest retail month.

“On top of that we don’t have much cashflow from the farm and we were left with no other option but to shut.”

The family will keep their licensing up to date and use the extra time to work their farm.

Mrs Wain said they had also made the effort to ensure their employees had new work opportunities lined up.

“We know this will have a flow-on effect to the Eidsvold community, which saddens us but we had no other choice,” Mrs Wain said.


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