Five million disappear as vibrant Sydney becomes ghost town

 

The seagulls are still flocking to Sydney's beaches but they are out of luck waiting for a hot chip to drop.

Bronte and Bondi beaches are closed after thousands flouted the government's ­social-distancing laws last weekend.

 

Bronte Beach is deserted, as can be seen from this drone image. Pictures: Toby Zerna
Bronte Beach is deserted, as can be seen from this drone image. Pictures: Toby Zerna

 

Office buildings in Barangaroo are virtually empty. Picture: Toby Zerna
Office buildings in Barangaroo are virtually empty. Picture: Toby Zerna

 

*Roads around The Rocks are eerily quiet. Picture: Toby Zerna
*Roads around The Rocks are eerily quiet. Picture: Toby Zerna

 

 

And, save for the odd jogger, limited to the pavements and paths because the beaches and pools are fenced off around these popular outdoor spots, there is no one around.

Picnic tables, BBQ areas and playgrounds - where families and tourists just days ago competed for space - are now deserted and the bustling cafes are empty.

Devoted swimmers who religiously crawl through their laps at Icebergs and Prince Alfred Park pools all year round have had to hang up their goggles as Sydneysiders pull together to stem the spread of COVID-19.

The city may not be in total lockdown yet but it is hard to believe this is a metropolis of more than 5 million people.

 

 

Hyde Park in the city is virtually empty. Picture: Toby Zerna
Hyde Park in the city is virtually empty. Picture: Toby Zerna

 

 

A deserted Bondi Icebergs after being forced to close down. Picture: Toby Zerna
A deserted Bondi Icebergs after being forced to close down. Picture: Toby Zerna

 

The roads around Barangaroo Reserve without cars. Picture: Toby Zerna
The roads around Barangaroo Reserve without cars. Picture: Toby Zerna

 

Crowds around Circular Quay have disappeared due to the virus. Picture: Toby Zerna
Crowds around Circular Quay have disappeared due to the virus. Picture: Toby Zerna

 

 

The normally bustling streets and wharves at Circular Quay, from the Rocks to Opera House, are deserted and the few drivers on even the busiest roads have the lanes to themselves. The normally-packed Cahill Expressway is almost empty.

The harbour is clear of ferries and boats with commuters curbed and business activity confined mostly to tasks which can be performed indoors.

"It's not quite a ghost town but it is the bare minimum (of people)," said photographer Toby Zerna who captured these striking drone images.

"And it is so quiet. I am noticing there is no plane noise, no choppers, the hum of the city is quieter.

Originally published as Five million disappear as vibrant Sydney becomes a ghost town


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