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Garden is in dire need of rainfall

ROSIE LIFE: Melvie Halfpenny with her roses at her Mundubbera home.
ROSIE LIFE: Melvie Halfpenny with her roses at her Mundubbera home. Philippe Coquerand

IT'S been a tough year for residents looking to grow their gardens.

The heat is on the way up again, heading towards 30 degrees with no sign of rain reaching the region until late next month.

For Mundubbera resident Melvie Halfpenny it hasn't been an easy task to get her garden looking good.

She said it has its good and bad days.

"We definitely need rain,” Mrs Halfpenny said.

"The heatwave was pretty bad last year and we had the drought so things haven't been easy around here.”

Mrs Halfpenny believes plants will keep dying if we don't receive any rain.

"You just can't keep the water up to it because it just puts your water bill up and things just die before your eyes,” she said.

Gardening has run through the family for generations and for Mrs Halfpenny it was a chance to ensure some quiet time for when things became stressful.

"I absolutely love it here, it's a great place to be and we're situated in a nice location of Mundubbera,” she said.

"I saw what my mum did and it was lovely and I love doing it too.

"It's really relaxing and it takes all your troubles away when you have any and you tend to leave it in the gardening.

"As a little child we'd plant vegetable seeds and they'd come up like the hair on your head and I think it was the kids touch.”

Mrs Halfpenny said it was also a good way of keeping the mind clear.

"It's quite therapeutic.”

"You forget about everything and just pull the weeds out.”

"If you get out here you start concentrating and you forget about all the other problems in the world.”

Although it's a great way of keeping fit and healthy, being able to enjoy gardening doesn't happen overnight and Mrs Halfpenny believes you've got to have the passion for it.

"You've got to be dedicated to doing it and wanting to do it,” she said.

"You can't be half hearted about it, it's not something you wake up one morning and say you'll be into gardening, it just won't work.”

Mrs Halfpenny waters her garden most days but said it was not always necessary depending on the types of plants in the garden.

"I water the garden and I keep track of all the weeds, the dead head flowers that are finished they just go into seeds and you don't get any more flowers, it's a lot of work,” she said.

She is ecstatic that her garden is thriving this spring.

"Well everything is just about to flower, beforehand they're just green things but now it's looking good,” she said.

"I don't really have a preference on what flower I like as I like everything.”

With summer only a few months away Mrs Halfpenny is looking for some new seasonal additions to join the family.

"In summer time when all those things go, you basically have your day-lilies because they're basically a winter flower and all the summer things come through,” she said.

Mrs Halfpenny believes gardening can be rewarding and it's based on trial and error.

"I've been pretty lucky with what I grow,” she said.

"It's all trial and error, some things aren't right here because it's too hot.”

The vegetables are currently growing in the backyard.

"We've got a bit of a vegie garden but it's quite hot and they're still growing,” Mrs Halfpenny said.

Earlier this month it was brought up in a council meeting that a gardening competition could be resurrected in the North Burnett and Mrs Halfpenny believes it would be a great idea.

"It all depends on the weather,” she said.

"Sometimes it comes to the shows and people haven't got things to put in the show because of the weather.”

Mrs Halfpenny said her garden was a work in progress.

"I try and add new plants to the garden to change it up a bit,” she said.

"The garden is quite spread out.

"I've got some roses in the front yard but they're struggling, they get diseases in the leaves and you keep spraying them, sometimes you feel like pulling them out.

"You can't beat a beautiful rose.”

Topics:  gardening gardening feature gardening tips mundubbera


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