SWINGING IT: Shane Taylor has played golf for almost 40 years, and he’s not planning to stop any time soon.
SWINGING IT: Shane Taylor has played golf for almost 40 years, and he’s not planning to stop any time soon. Anastassia Perets

Golf a lifelong game for Shane

YEARS of practice and experience are behind Shane Taylor's golf game on the Monto fairways.

The four-time club champion and club treasurer had his first swing at a ball at the age of 27 in search of a new sport following retirement from football.

He found a perfect fit in golf and now, aged 64, is still swinging.

Taylor's ability was developed over time through a self-teaching method.

"I did it just by watching other people and through trial and error," he said.

"I had my first ever lesson three years ago, and only had it because it was free as Monto Golf Club has golf professionals that come to the club every once in a while to give lessons as part of a government initiative."

The lack of direct coaching from early on did not stop Taylor from competing at a high level.

His golf career highlight is representing Queensland at a national event held in Victoria on a sand greens course in 1993 and 1997.

Taylor placed in the top 20 of the event on his first time around, and it aligned with his best shot ever.

"I have got a hole-in-one twice in my life, and one of them happened to be at the national competition, which was from about 214m away," he said.

The other hole-in-one he got was prior to the 1993 competition, from a distance of 150m.

His travels to Victoria continued in the early 2000s, and he was invited by Golf Queensland to go to Victoria to play in a veterans competition.

He now plays every week and travels to other centres eight to 10 times a year.

This year he won three veteran open days across central Queensland.

"I'm still a single-figure handicap golfer, and it's been only a few years since my lowest handicap of two," he said.

"Right now I'm at about six."

One of the drivers for Taylor to continue to improve is that a day's result really is in the player's hands.

"Unlike games like tennis where you have direct opponents, in golf you are playing against the course," he said.

"You can't control the situation of the course, and have to contain anger.

"I don't throw the club around or anything.

"I think that's a waste of time, but I do exhale really loudly if I'm frustrated."

When not playing, Taylor takes the opportunity to mentor and coach up-and-coming players.

"I think anyone with a talent or skill, they should be sharing it," he said.

"The best part is seeing the younger players grow and improve."

Other sports that Taylor has been heavily involved with include horse events, mainly pony club and rodeos, and cricket.

In his professional life, Taylor worked in the forestry department and was the regional manager for the northern part of Queensland.

He retired four years ago.

Aside from golf, Taylor keeps fit on his hobby farm in Mulgildie.


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