RURAL AID INCOMING: Rural Aid volunteers Bernie Rankmore, Chirley Semmens and Janice James with her dog Alford and their team leader Bill Wallace. Picture: Laura Blackmore
RURAL AID INCOMING: Rural Aid volunteers Bernie Rankmore, Chirley Semmens and Janice James with her dog Alford and their team leader Bill Wallace. Picture: Laura Blackmore

Have your say in Gayndah’s $100,000 makeover

IT'S time to have your say on a once in a lifetime opportunity for the township of Gayndah.

Suggestion forms are now available at the Gayndah Real Estate Office and Gayndah Library for those with innovative ideas for its Rural Aid makeover.

Gayndah and Monto were a part of ten rural towns in Australia selected for a complete $100,000 makeover by Rural Aid Australia.

A big idea card and two minute business survey must be completed to signify what makeover project you'd like completed.

Some examples on the form include painting the old school house at the museum, repairing signage, maintenance on local club houses, and more.

Vice president of the Gayndah Development Association (GDA) Jo Dowling said initial meetings will start to be held with small town specialist Peter Kenyon from Friday January 31 to Sunday February 2.

"Throughout the day on Saturday (February 1), there'll be groups who will have appointments with Peter and his team to receive feedback," Mrs Dowling said.

"On Saturday night we'll then have a dinner at the Gayndah Showgrounds at 6.30pm, with all members of the community encouraged to come down."

Following this meeting, Mrs Dowling said a meeting will be held on Sunday to finalise what the town is going to do.

In the project, $10,000 will be used for the facilitated workshops, while $90,000 will be used to source local materials for the maintenance project.

Over 50 volunteers will then descend on the town in a few months time to assist in projects identified by the Gayndah community.

Mrs Dowling believes the rural aid army will be bringing more to the town than just the immediate cash value.

"You've got these volunteers who will be camping in the town, with their labour not being charged. So we're getting the value of labour, while they're here for the week eating, buying fuel, and putting money back into the town.

"It's a lot more than $100,000."

Councillor for division three John Zahl believes Gayndah is extraordinarily fortunate to be selected as one the ten towns in Australia.

"To be able to have one of the rural aid packages, it's a matter from heaven," Cr Zahl said.

He went onto encourage residents to come down to the dinner, saying if you have an idea, come down and tell them.

"It'll be the weekend to say stuff, and it'll be a good exercise with lots of people having lots of great ideas," he said.

"And I'm more than happy to hear them all."

Suggestions are encouraged to be completed before January 31, and should be submitted at the Rural Aid Feedback Box in the Gayndah library.


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