Two dogs found bashed to death earlier this year were subjects of a council investigation prior to their deaths.
Two dogs found bashed to death earlier this year were subjects of a council investigation prior to their deaths.

Justice wanted for two dogs savagely beaten to death

Two dogs found allegedly bashed to death earlier this year were subjects of a council investigation prior to their deaths.

A dead blue heeler and a red heeler - that was alive with a broken neck and back -

were found by two women walking their own dogs along a track at Selma Weir near Emerald on July 26.

They managed to get the red cattle dog to a vet, where she was euthanised due to the severity of her injuries.

In July, the women who found the dogs said the blue heeler also had a suspected broken back and facial injuries, and had blood pouring from his mouth.

Officers from Biosecurity Queensland, part of the Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (DAF) started investigating the deaths after a complaint was lodged with the RSPCA, who do not have an inspector in the area.
Outraged animals lovers also created a Facebook page titled 'Justice for Red and Blue' in an effort to help authorities find whoever was responsible and believe charges should be laid.

"There are two levels of charges that can be laid here, one through our criminal system, the other through Biosecurity," they wrote on a post on the page in August.

“Red”, a red cattle dog found with a broken neck and back in Emerald on July 26. She was found lying next to a dead male blue heeler. Picture: Supplied
“Red”, a red cattle dog found with a broken neck and back in Emerald on July 26. She was found lying next to a dead male blue heeler. Picture: Supplied

A Biosecurity Queensland spokeswoman declined to answer several questions about the case, but told The Courier-Mail the investigation had been completed.

"An investigation into an incident involving two dogs found at the Selma Weir near Emerald on Sunday 26 July 2020 has concluded and a final report on the matter is being finalised," she said.

"Biosecurity Queensland is unable to comment further at this stage."

But The Courier-Mail understands a 39-year-old mother of two owned the dogs and allegedly shot them after been told by the local council the pets were to be removed from her property and euthanised.

The woman allegedly said she shot them on her property, but that rain had washed the dogs' bodies down a nearby river.

A Central Highlands Regional Council spokeswoman confirmed the pets were subject to a separate council investigation prior to their deaths.

"Council rangers were in the process of investigating the two animals for regulated dog proposals as per the Animal Management (Cats & Dogs) Act 2008," she said.

"This was in response to a complaint made against the dogs. The owner had been made aware of this and their options under the Act.

"This investigation was ongoing when the incident occurred."

The investigation into the death and injuries of two cattle dogs found in Central Queensland in July has been completed. Picture: Supplied
The investigation into the death and injuries of two cattle dogs found in Central Queensland in July has been completed. Picture: Supplied

The council spokeswoman said once a dog had been declared a 'regulated' dog, the owner must follow certain conditions under the Queensland legislation, or could choose to surrender the dog to the council.

Under the legislation, the term 'regulated dog' is used to refer to dogs that have been declared to be menacing, dangerous or restricted.

Restricted dogs are breeds that are prohibited from being imported into Australia.

A dog may be deemed to fall under the 'regulated' category if it has either "seriously attacked" a person or another animal, or it has acted in a way that causes fear to someone or another animal or it had the potential to do both, under the legislation.

Volunteers from animal rescue groups A Mini Rescue, Domestic Animal Rescue and Education (D.A.R.E), Central Queensland Animal Society Inc (CQASI) and Soquilichi Rescue Ranch, who created the Justice for Red and Blue Facebook page, said they would not give up.

"The Biosecurity senior investigator handling the case had previously advised that the findings of the investigation would be openly available," they wrote in a post to the page.

"We are awaiting response, which we will openly share with you.

"Stay with us. We are seeking Justice for Red and Blue. We have not given up."

Originally published as Justice wanted for two dogs savagely beaten to death


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