TRAINING: Biggenden PCYC Emergency Services cadets took the tour of Mount Rawdon and hope to participate in the mine's rescue training later in the year.
TRAINING: Biggenden PCYC Emergency Services cadets took the tour of Mount Rawdon and hope to participate in the mine's rescue training later in the year. Alex Treacy

Mine, yours, ours: Mount Rawdon wants to open up

EVOLUTION Mining has revealed they would like to increase their annual tour of the Mount Rawdon gold mine to twice-yearly.

Speaking during the Saturday morning tour of the mine, general manager Jamie Coad said his plan was to "demystify mining”.

"The more kids we get on the tour the more likely they will want to get involved in mining,” he said.

"If we get two or three interested in being a miner from today, then that's a good thing.”

Staring out over the cavernous open-cut pit, Mr Coad said having visitors to the site allowed miners like himself to see the operations through different eyes.

"We see this as normal, but if you've not been out to a mine before you would think it's pretty interesting,” he said.

Mr Coad also revealed the mine was in preliminary discussions with the Gidarjil Development Corporation, an indigenous-owned training and employment enterprise based in Bundaberg, about hosting Gidarjil traineeships at the mine in the future.

MINER: Mount Rawdon Operation general manager Jamie Coad wants to
MINER: Mount Rawdon Operation general manager Jamie Coad wants to "demystify" mining through more tours. Alex Treacy

Almost 40 people attended the Saturday morning tour, including 16 from the Biggenden PCYC Emergency Services cadets.

Group leader Moira Thompson said while the cadets were out to Mount Perry regularly for bushwalking, this was the first time they had taken the tour, although they have previously participated in Mount Rawdon's mines rescue training.

"Today we've come to see the mine from a different angle,” Ms Thompson said.

They hope to be involved again in the mine's rescue training later this year.

Mr Coad said the training provided important life skills.

"It's not just first aid, it's also things like doing rope rescues and working with heights,” he said.

Cadet Angus McAskill, 15, said this was the second time he had been to a mine site.

He said he found the experience informative, but there was one thing he couldn't get off his mind, looking at the open-cut pit.

"I just thought about racing cars on it, like Top Gear did,” Mr McAskill said.


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