ANZAC LEGACY: Warrant Officer Michael Smith and RSL president Boyd Baker speaking with students.
ANZAC LEGACY: Warrant Officer Michael Smith and RSL president Boyd Baker speaking with students. Adam McCleery

Passing on their legacy to students

GAYNDAH schools were afforded the opportunity to have Warrant Officer Michael Smith from the 2nd Combat Engineer Regiment speak to students in the lead up to Anzac Day.

Gayndah RSL president Boyd Baker organised the tour of schools in the area and Warrant Officer Michael Smith said it was an important thing to pass the legacy onto younger generations.

"I think it's a good opportunity to promote what Anzac Day is, especially noting that we no longer have that generation of solider here,” Warrant Officer Smith said.

"So it's important for the current generation to be informed of the sacrifice they were forced to endure and what it is they achieved for the country.”

Warrant Officer Smith spoke to students about his own experiences in the Army, giving the students a first hand perspective form an active soldier.

Mr Baker said he felt it was important for young students to be exposed to this.

"It is crucial,” Mr Baker said.

"It's difficult to communicate with the kids in a level that they can understand but if we don't so it then it's lost.”

St Joseph's student James Parr said he had learned a lot through school about the Anzac legacy and having a real solider speaking to them helped give perspective.

"I think it was really god for him to speak with us,” James said.

"It was pretty interesting to hear what it is really like and it shows an example of how important Anzac Day is and how we should remember and commemorate them.”

James is an example of why soldiers and veterans visit schools and speak with the young generation.

"For me it is a really important time at Anzac Day,” James said.

"Where we remember and be very mature about the war and their sacrifice.

"There was a lot more too.”

St Joseph's principal Ben Gray echoed the sentiments others shared.

"I think it's extremely significant and it doesn't matter what the age gap is, the story is what continues,” Mr Gray said.

"We never have any shortage of students during the march who have the medals or photos of family members they have never met but those students still know every inch of that story.”


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