NORTH BURNETT’S BEST: Teaching principal Lyn Brook from Coalstoun Lakes State School has been voted the region’s best teacher. Picture: Erica Murree.
NORTH BURNETT’S BEST: Teaching principal Lyn Brook from Coalstoun Lakes State School has been voted the region’s best teacher. Picture: Erica Murree.

Region’s best teacher prepares to teach kids remotely

FOLLOWING a rigorous few days of voting, the North Burnett’s best teacher was announced last week.

Teaching principal of Coalstoun Lakes State School Lyn Brook topped the leaderboard, securing more than 60 votes from our online poll.

Ms Brook said to even be nominated by her community was an honour.

“To have that acknowledgment from the parents and the community is just huge,” Ms Brook said.

“Having that respect from people who know you’re going give their children the best possible education, that’s what my aim is every day I go into work.”

Ms Brook was originally appointed as a teacher aide at Coalstoun Lakes in 1988, a position she thrived in.

She attended university after realising teaching was her desired field, and completed her degree in 2002.

Biggenden State School then offered her a position in a behaviour management role shortly afterwards, before she started as the acting principal at Coalstoun Lakes in 2013.

“I then applied for the position in 2018, and was successful,” she said.

“I feel like I’ve done a full circle.”

Coalstoun Lakes State School runs from Prep to Year 6, and 25 students are enrolled at the small country school.

“When I was a teacher aide I had a love for kids, and I have no kids of my own, but I would often think that if I did, what would I want them doing, and learning,” Ms Brook said.

“I walk in through that gate every morning for them, and there’s no other reason that I go to school, and the children pick up on that.”

Schools around the state will be providing different methods of teaching for the first five weeks of Term 2, Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk announced this week.

Ms Palaszczuk said schools would remain open only to children of essential workers and the vulnerable, while the rest would learn from home.

READ MORE: Everything you need to know about term two

Ms Brook said she was in the process of organising remote learning for her 25 students, but admitted there might be some difficulties ahead.

“There’ll be numerous teaching styles being used, with lessons being put on USBs because not everyone has the technology,” she said.

“I’ve photocopied lessons and units for students, as well as inquired about getting a line to do a teleconference on five key subjects.”

The perils of country internet connections will be working against her and other schools in the region, as families battle to access a reliable internet service.

“With a class of 25, the logistics will be interesting, but we have to cater to every need and do the best we can in the situation we’re in,” Ms Brook said.

“The word unprecedented has come across the news often, but it actually is.

“I asked my students on the last week of school to keep diary entries every day, as this will be history in the years to come.”


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