The Seabin Project is heading to the US to expand its international market.
The Seabin Project is heading to the US to expand its international market.

Revolutionary technology expands into global market

A SUNSHINE Coast sailor is about to embark on a tour of the US to expand the revolutionary Seabin in the international market.

Seabins, developed on the Sunshine Coast, are an ocean cleaning technology that can catch an estimated of 1.5kgs of trash, including microplastics, per day.

David Turtin of The Seabin Project will leave for the US this week ahead of the organisation opening up to the American market in 2019.

"We've got meetings with several foundations and ocean plastic groups over there, and we're also meeting up with a lot of clients that have got pre-sale interests," he said.

Mr Turton said the US represented the organisation's biggest online market.

"It represents something like 48 per cent of our total global web traffic," he said.

He said while it had taken "some time" to prepare for the American market, the team was ready to get started.

 

Seabins can collect up to 1.5kf of rubbish each day.
Seabins can collect up to 1.5kf of rubbish each day.

The Wharf at Mooloolaba recently trialled the floating technology, showing how polluted Sunshine Coast's waterways really were.

"We pulled an extraordinary amount out of Mooloolah River in that trial. I think it was about 600kg in three weeks," Mr Turton said.

"It was nuts."

He said there were thousands of cigarette butts, plastic wrappers and polystyrene balls collected during the trial.

"It was probably one of the busiest catches, or highest rate of catch, we've had around the world," he said.

Mooloolaba Marina has started a crowd-funding campaign so it can have a permanent Seabin at The Wharf.

Adding to Seabin's international recognition, Mr Turton's daughter, Portsea Turton, has just been named the Australian ambassador for World Oceans Day Youth Advisory Council.

Portsea works as part of The Seabin Project team, where she's seen the devastating effects plastic pollution has on local and global communities first-hand.

"She's very excited about that, and I'm just a bit of a proud parent," Mr Turton said.

The Seabin Foundation is also now up and running, helping with education and awareness of plastic pollution.

"Our number one message is stopping rubbish at the source. Bin it, don't toss it," Mr Turton said.


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