NO STRIKE: St Joseph's Catholic Primary School in Gayndah is business as usual. Credit: Sam Turner.
NO STRIKE: St Joseph's Catholic Primary School in Gayndah is business as usual. Credit: Sam Turner.

St Joseph’s Catholic Primary opts out of work bans

ST JOSEPH'S Catholic Primary has opted out of the protected workplace bans for Catholic schools across Queensland.

More than 7000 Queensland Catholic school teachers and support staff from 195 Catholic schools were set to commence work bans on November 7.

This is part of protected industrial action to address teacher workload and maintaining the 30-year wage parity with the state sector, through the provision of a $1250 one off payment to all school staff.

St Joseph's Catholic Primary principal Terese Shephard told the Times that none of her staff had indicated they would be taking part in the workplace bans.

"They may have voted for it but, at this stage, there has not been any protected action happening at St Joseph's," Mrs Shephard said.

These work bans include banning attendance from staff meetings, banning duties during scheduled meal breaks, banning playground and transport supervision, and more.

Indicating there were quite a number of staff that weren't members of the Independent Education Union of Australia - Queensland and Northern Territory (IEUA-QNT), Mrs Shephard said there was a reason why there hadn't been any disruptions.

"If I was to hazard a guess, it'd be that they care for the students and they put them first.

"They're always our first priority."

One concerned parent said he believed the strike would have a larger effect in metropolitan areas.

"I don't live far from the school and with Gayndah being a small town, transport supervision isn't a huge problem," he said.

"If this was happening somewhere such as Brisbane with kids using more public transport, then it would be a bigger issue."

IEUA-QNT branch secretary Terry Burke said members of the union were ready to resolve the negotiations, with the onus being on the employers to address their employees' concerns.

"Taking strike action is an absolute last resort for employees and would be the result of the failure of Queensland Catholic school employers to address these remaining, significant staff concerns," Mr Burke said.


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