Gayndah's Denise and Errol Lashford want police and council to begin enforcing the no cycling or skateboarding on Capper St rule.
Gayndah's Denise and Errol Lashford want police and council to begin enforcing the no cycling or skateboarding on Capper St rule. Alex Treacy

Two-wheel terror: couple say enough

DENISE Lashford is visually impaired.

One eye has five per cent vision, the other 11 per cent.

So she can't see the bicycles and skateboards coming-she just feels the whoosh of air as they shoot past her, perilously close to hitting her sometimes.

Mrs Lashford and husband Errol say they have had enough.

They want police and council to enforce the law.

"It's an accident waiting for somewhere to happen,” Mr Lashford said.

"They ride like there's no tomorrow.”

His wife agreed.

Mrs Lashford used to volunteer at the Gunther Village Op Shop and said she would regularly see fast-moving cyclists and skaters almost knock over elderly shoppers exiting the store.

"Older people have stopped coming down so much,” she said.

Part of the issue, Mr Lashford said, is that there is only one sign prohibiting cycling and skating on Capper St, located in front of the NAB on the corner of Pineapple St.

"One sign is not good enough,” he said.

The sign on Capper St prohibiting cycling or skateboarding through the main commercial end.
The sign on Capper St prohibiting cycling or skateboarding through the main commercial end. Alex Treacy

Mr Lashford thinks more signs need to be added so students of the three local schools, as well as backpackers, are more likely to see them.

Councillor John Zahl said after speaking with Mr Lashford he had submitted a request to council for signs to be erected on Pineapple, Meson and Warton streets.

Cr Zahl said he is hopeful they would be installed within one month.

He said there is nothing wrong with the law but, as in other areas such as speeding or drug use, it is a question of enforcement.

Gayndah officer-in-charge Sergeant Josh Ryan said he believed riding on the footpath was a council issue to enforce.

"If people ride with no helmets, or in a manner that would be dangerous or reckless then we are involved,” he said.

"But simply for riding on the footpath is not a law the QPS enforce.”

Under the Queensland Road Rules, disobeying a no bicycles sign could result in a $130 fine.


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